fact sheets

National Resolution on High-Stakes Testing

RESOLUTION ON HIGH-STAKES TESTING

The New Federal Education Law: A Basis for a Stronger Testing Resistance and Assessment Reform Movement

The New Federal Education Law:

A  Basis for a Stronger Testing Resistance and Assessment Reform Movement

FEA Recommendations for ESEA on Assessment, Accountability and School Improvement, Jan. 2015

Forum on Educational Accountability

Recommendations for Improving Federal Law - January 2015

What State Legislators Can Do to Advance Assessment Reform

Across the nation, resistance to test overuse and misuse reached unprecedented levels in spring 2014. The rapidly growing movement built on significant test opposition unleashed in 2013. This year, resistance erupted in more states with far more participants, and it won notable victories.

The first wave of tangible “wins” included many significant steps forward. In the past two years:

Time for a Real Testing Moratorium

Time for a Real Testing Moratorium

Resistance to the overuse and misuse of standardized tests is expanding rapidly across the nation (Guisbond, 2014). The movement’s goals are to roll back testing overkill, eliminate damaging high stakes, and create an assessment system that supports teaching and learning while providing useful information to parents, communities and states. Some states have responded to the uprising by temporarily pausing some sanctions for teachers and schools.

Teacher Evaluation Should Not Rest on Student Test Scores (Revised 2016)

The new federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) does not require states to have educator evaluation systems. If a state chooses to do so, it does not have to include student test scores.  To win federal Race to the Top grants or waivers from No Child Left Behind (NCLB), most states adopted teacher and principal evaluation systems based heavily on student test scores. Many educators have resisted these unproven policies.

Pearson's History of Testing Problems

compiled by Bob Schaeffer, Public Education Director
FairTest: National Center for Fair & Open Testing
Updated November 17, 2015

1998 California – test score delivery delayed

1999-2000 Arizona – 12,000 tests misgraded due to flawed answer key

2000 Florida – test score delivery delayed resulting in $4 million fine

New York Performance Standards Consortium Fact Sheet

Performance Assessments Succeed in New York (Updated Nov. 2014)

FairTest Infographic: Common Core: More Tests, But Not Better

 

Common Core Assessment Myths and Realities: Moratorium Needed From More Tests, Costs, Stress

NOTE:

Syndicate content