k-12

Standardized Testing and Students with Disabilities

Does Inclusion in Testing Mean Inclusion in Meaningful Learning?

  1. Federal law requires 95% test participation, including for the vast majority of students with disabilities. (One percent of all students may be assessed to alternative standards with alternative assessments. Federal law leaves it up to each state to decide what to do if a school or district does not test 95%.) The theory is that full inclusion in testing will drive full inclusion in learning the “standard” academic curriculum.

Why You Can Boycott Standardized Tests Without Fear of Federal Penalties to Your School (Updated February 2018)

Parents and students often fear the threat that if they opt out of state exams, their school could lose funding. However, this is an empty threat: no school has lost funding because of opting out.

In fact, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) specifically authorizes states to allow parents to opt their children out of exams. Ten states (Alaska, California, Colorado, Idaho, North Dakota, Minnesota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Utah and Wisconsin) have laws specifically allowing parents to opt their children out. None has ever been sanctioned.

Just Say No to Standardized Tests: Why and How to Opt Out (Updated April 2018)

Testing overuse and misuse is damaging public education. It eats up classroom time, narrows curriculum and drives many students out of school. It perpetuates a false narrative of failure and puts schools in low-income communities at risk of closure or privatization.

Graduation Test Update: States That Recently Eliminated or Scaled Back High School Exit Exams (Updated MAY 2019)

Graduation Test Update:
States That Recently Eliminated or Scaled Back High School Exit Exams

(Updated May 2019)

The number of states requiring high school graduation exams in language arts and math has declined rapidly over the past few years. Only eleven states have graduation tests in place for the high school class of 2020, down from a high of 27 that had or planned such tests. The current number is the lowest level since at least the mid-1990s.

Federal Law and Regulations on Opting Out Under ESSA (Updated February 2018)

(NOTE: For a print formatted PDF of this fact sheet click here)

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires that states assess 95% of all students, and 95% of each “subgroup” in every school with federally mandated annual state tests in English and math. It says that in calculating average school test scores, a school must include in the denominator the greater of either all test takers, or 95% of eligible test takers.

Implementing Performance Assessment: FairTest Webinar

 

Join us for a webinar on Feb 12, 2017 at 8:00 PM EST.

Register now!

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3706654188322704899

Personalized Learning or Continuous Online Testing?

Technology “permits us now to do in nanoseconds things we shouldn’t be doing at all.”
– Gerald Bracey

Education policymakers and technology providers have joined forces to accelerate a longtime push for “test data-driven” education interventions. Both sectors look to computer-based curricula and data collected with online tests to control classrooms and define educational outcomes.

Fighting for Assessment Reform under ESSA

The federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest version of the long-standing Elementary and Secondary Education Act. It replaces the widely despised “No Child Left Behind.” The new law presents both opportunities and dangers for the testing resistance and reform movement.

Assessment Matters: Constructing Model State Systems to Replace Testing Overkill

Assessment Matters: Constructing Model State Systems to Replace Testing Overkill

This report describes how states can overhaul their assessment systems under the Innovative Assessment pilot program in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).  It shows policymakers how to:

Back-To-School Report Tallies 2016 Testing Reform Victories

for further information:                                                                
Lisa Guisbond (617) 959-2371
Bob Schaeffer  (239) 395-6773

For release Wednesday, September 8, 2016

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