Testing Resistance & Reform News: November 18 - 24, 2015

The pending Congressional overhaul of "No Child Left Behind" will not in any way undermine the national, grassroots high-stakes testing resistance. Instead, it provides additional incentives for parents, students, teachers, administrators and community leaders leaders to press for even more meaningful assessment reforms at the national, state and local levels. This week's stories of progress come from 22 states as well as the college admissions arena.

Happy Thanksgiving to all!

More than 500,000 Refused Tests in 2015

for further information:

Bob Schaeffer      (239) 395-6773

Lisa Guisbond      (617) 959-2371                                                          

for immediate release Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Testing Resistance & Reform News: November 11 - 17, 2015

It may be hard to believe but the already fast pace of assessment reform news continues to accelerate, reflecting the rapidly growing strength of the grassroots movement against standardized testing misuse and overuse. Activists will pay particular attention to Washington DC in the coming weeks as Congress finally appears ready to take up a bill to replace "No Child Left Behind," which shifts considerable power over testing and accountability to state government policymakers.

National NCLB Overhaul May Soon Begin Moving on Capitol Hill

Testing Resistance & Reform News: November 4 - 10, 2015

The U.S. assessment reform movement continues to rack up victories, as summarized in a new report from FairTest and another week of clips from around the nation.  Please help FairTest build on this success by contributing to support our Heroes in Education awards to Lani Guinier and Nancy Carlsson-Paige

Testing Reform Victories 2015: Growing Grassroots Movement Rolls Back Testing Overkill

for further information:


Lisa Guisbond     (617) 959-2371

Dr. Monty Neill     (617) 477-9792

Testing Resistance & Reform News: October 28 - November 3, 2015

Two major stories dominated the week's news. President Obama's belated recognition of standardized exam overkill and another federal government report documenting academic stagnation during the "test-and-punish" era provided more ammunition for the country's rapidly growing assessment reform movement. In many states parents, educators, local officials and community leaders are gearing up for major campaigns to significantly reduce testing volume, eliminate high-stakes, and open the door to better ways to assess student learning.

Independent Test Results Show NCLB Fails


No Child Left Behind (NCLB) was signed into law in 2002, the latest version of the long-standing Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). Its provisions, such as testing grades 3-8 annually in reading and math and punitive sanctions, took effect over the next several years. The law is eight years overdue for reauthorization by Congress. In 2015, both the House and Senate approved reauthorization bills and as of October 2015 are working on a compromise.

FairTest Reaction: Latest NAEP Results Add To Evidence Of Test-And-Punish Era Failures

for further information:                                                                 

Testing Resistance & Reform News: October 21 - 27, 2015

To understand why President Obama and Secretary Duncan were compelled to admit that there is too much standardized testing in U.S. public schools, scan this week's news clips with stories from fully half the 50 states. Across the country, parents, teachers, education administrators, school boards and community leaders have built powerful campaigns to roll back test overuse and misuse. Growing support for assessment reform is forcing politicians to act. Even if their first moves are largely symbolic, more tangible victories will follow if political pressure continues to escalate.

Reform Movement Reacts to Obama Administration Statement, School Chiefs Survey on Testing Overkill

for further information:                                                                 

Bob Schaeffer (239) 395-6773

                   cell (239) 699-0468

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