Students with Disabilities Report Executive Summary: Preliminary Findings March 2004

Executive Summary:
Preliminary Findings March 2004

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This Executive Summary of Preliminary Findings incorporates
the June 2003 Preliminary Findings. All data are for the 2000-2001
school year.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

· Discipline. States with more students with disabilities
in regular class more of the time tend to have lower discipline
rates.
· LRE. States with graduation tests and/or other high stakes
policies tend to place students with disabilities in more restrictive
settings.
· Participation. States with more unrestricted accommodations
tend to have higher participation rates of students with disabilities
on regular state tests.

DISCIPLINE

States with particular high stakes policies tend to have higher
discipline rates, defined as the unduplicated count of students
removed from school by school personnel or hearing officers and
students serving long-term suspensions. Rewards that are correlated
with higher discipline rates include: student non-monetary awards
and/or recognition, student financial awards, and bonuses or monetary
rewards for buildings.

States with more unrestricted accommodations tend to have lower
discipline rates. Lower discipline rates are correlated with the
total number of unrestricted accommodations and with the total
number of unrestricted equipment accommodations.

States with a higher percentage of students with disabilities
in regular class 80% or more of the time tend to have lower discipline
rates.

LEAST RESTRICTIVE ENVIRONMENT (LRE)

States with particular high stakes policies such as high school
graduation tests tend to place students with disabilities in more
restrictive settings. Several statistically significant relationships
also exist between LRE and sanctions and rewards. Sanctions that
tend to be correlated with placing students with disabilities
in more restrictive settings include: the total number of sanctions
in a state, states with any sanctions at the building or district
level, state takeover of a district and replacement of individual
principals or teachers. Rewards that tend to be correlated with
more restrictive placements include monetary or non-monetary rewards
at the building level.

It is interesting to note that: 1) sanctions were correlated
with placing students with disabilities in more restrictive settings
at both the building and district levels and 2) rewards were correlated
with placing students with disabilities in more restrictive settings
only at the building level.

PARTICIPATION

States with more unrestricted accommodations tend to have a
higher percentage of students with disabilities participate in
regular state reading and mathematics tests. Higher participation
rates tend to be correlated with the total number of unrestricted
accommodations and the total number of unrestricted response accommodations.
In addition to the total number of unrestricted accommodations
and total number of unrestricted response accommodations, there
were also correlations between participation and specific accommodations
such as proctor/scribe, communication device, seat location/proximity
and minimizing distractions.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This issue of Preliminary Findings incorporates the initial
June 2003 Preliminary Findings.

For more detail and/or discussion of potential implications
of the findings, go to www.ssco.org/saas/ and click on March 2004
Preliminary Findings.

BACKGROUND

The purpose of this national study, State Accountability for
All Students (SAAS), is to provide policy makers, practitioners
and parents with data regarding the connections between state
policies and the participation/performance of students with disabilities
taking the regular state tests. SAAS is also examining the unintended
consequences of high stakes testing for students with disabilities
in areas such as placement in the least restrictive environment,
graduation rates and discipline. SAAS is an OSEP-funded national
study operated by the University of Dayton in cooperation with
the School Study Council of Ohio.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Please visit our web site (www.ssco.org/saas/) for additional
information on Project SAAS and its partner organizations or advisory
committee. If you have questions or suggestions, please contact
us.

John Herner, Project Director
University of Dayton
4807 Evanswood Drive, Suite 300
Columbus, Ohio 43229
Voice (614) 785-1163
Fax (614) 785-0513
E-mail: jherner@ssco.org
Project web site: www.ssco.org/saas/